How Working for Carers is making a difference

Working for Carers aims to support 1,556 carers and former carers in London to move towards employment. Carers are eligible to join the project if they are 25 years old or over, able to live and work in the UK, and not in any form of employment.

The project is funded for six years by the European Social Fund and The National Lottery Community Fund. It is being delivered between October 2016 and September 2022 by Carers Trust in partnership with its network of partners across London, with four taking a lead role in delivering the project (Hubs).

Progress to date

At the end of June 2020, 881 carers and former carers had registered with the project. The registered carers are from all 33 London boroughs. Of these:

  • 20% have moved into employment.
  •  60% have accessed training, and 106 have moved into education or training.
  • 49% have been supported to job-search; 98 are job-searching independently.
  • 16% have undertaken volunteering.

Participants who find a job or take part in job-searching or education/training complete a satisfaction survey. Of these:

  • 89% said their confidence had improved.
  • 84% said they had gained new skills.
  • 60% have accessed support with their own health and wellbeing.

Carers' stories

Hear from carers who have been supported by Working for Carers.

"I thought my drive had been extinguished, but the embers were still there. They just needed to be reignited and that’s what Working for Carers have helped me to do.” Paul

Find out how Working for Carers helped Paul, who is caring for his partner, rediscover his passion for the creative industry.

"At the workshop I read a leaflet offering support to people in my position. It made me feel that I really could get my life back on track.” Tanya

See how Working for Carers set Tanya, who is caring for her husband, on a new path to working as a security officer.

Evaluating Working for Carers

The first phase of the project (2016-2019) was evaluated by Ecorys.  The full report and executive summary are available to download.

Key learning from the evaluation includes:

  • Specialist carers organisations are best placed to provide employability support for unpaid carers.
  • The holistic approach is about looking at the barriers and needs of each individual; it is important to signpost early to specialist support.
  • The project has increased its reach, both nationally and locally, through partnership working (using the hub and spoke model).
  • The project can be replicated if delivery is tailored for local demographics, delivered by community-base partners, and a shared identity is achieved.

The second phase of the project (2019-2022) is being evaluated by Wavehill.

Community Fund

 

Date revised: 23/07/2020