Caring can be a lonely time for unpaid carers. But with your help, we can help stop the loneliness.

83-year-old Doris cares for her husband Sid

Woman sitting down. Shutterstock.comFor the last three years, 83 year old Doris has been caring for her husband Sid who has vascular dementia. As his health has deteriorated she has struggled to cope with the emotional and physical impact of looking after him every day and night.

While having a regular check-up, her local GP gave Doris a leaflet about her local carer service. Doris got in touch and one of our support workers visited and with Doris’ agreement came up with a plan for how her home life, health and wellbeing could be improved. She particularly values her trips to her local carer service every fortnight while an experienced staff member stays with Sid:

It is so wonderful to know he is being looked after so well. It means that for a time, I can forget my troubles and enjoy myself.”

In the UK today there are more than 50,000 carers like Doris who are over the age of 80. Please give £50 so that carers like Doris can have a regular break from caring.

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Tom cares for his wife

Man. Shutterstock.comWe know that many people do not see themselves as carers – people like Tom who became a full-time carer when his wife Polly was seriously injured in a car accident.

Of course I would do anything for her, I love her. I can’t bear to see her distressed and in pain."

Tom had been a project manager for a construction company and the couple had been looking forward to buying their first home and hoped to start a family. But after the accident, all their hopes had to be put to one side. As the couple’s savings steadily disappeared and after  years of intense caring, Tom was exhausted and close to breaking down

Sometimes one change can make a big difference, so the first thing we did when we met Tom was give him a grant towards a new bed.

There are 1.8 million working age carers in the UK today. Your £100 or whatever you can afford can go towards a new mattress or bed so that an exhausted carer like Tom can get the rest they desperately need. 

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Young carer Elsie cares for her younger brother and mother

Teenage girl. Shutterstock.comWe estimate that there are 175,000 carers in Britain today who are 18 or younger. Carers like 15-year-old Elsie who since the age of six she has been helping her younger brother and her mother who has severe arthritis and uses a wheelchair.

When we met her Elsie rarely socialised outside school hours and had been teased and bullied at school. She was spending at least two hours every weekday and even more at weekends helping her family.

Carers like Elsie are so often overlooked. Teachers, social workers and GPs may not be aware that some of the young people they come into contact with are carers. However, once identified, young carers can see a positive change in their lives with the right level of support.

When Elsie came on a trip to an adventure theme park we arranged for a group of young carers, it was heart-warming to hear how much she enjoyed it.

Just one gift from you can make the difference between hope and despair, exhaustion and rest.

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Please give generously

Your gift, no matter what size, will enable us to help more carers when they turn to us. Each gift is appreciated by us and the carers we can reach. Thank you.

In the interest of privacy all names and photos of carers have been changed. All library photos posed by models.